Derek Walmsley hosts a special show on quietest composer in the world, Jakob Ullmann, playing selections from this year's Editions RZ collection Fremde Zeit Addendum.

Praha: Celetná - Karlova - Maiselova
from Fremde Zeit - Addendum
(Edition RZ)

Voice, Books And FIRE 3
from Voice, Books And FIRE 3
(Edition RZ)
Solo I + II + III
from Fremde Zeit - Addendum
(Edition RZ)
A Catalogue Of Sounds
from A Catalogue Of Sounds
(Edition RZ)
Disappearing Musics
from Fremde Zeit - Addendum
(Edition RZ)
Composition for String Quartet 2
from Fremde Zeit - Addendum
(Edition RZ)
All music tonight is by Jakob Ullmann. There are no interruptions during the programme, and the following notes and information were given by Derek Walmsley on Twitter during the show.
Jakob Ullmann was born in Saxony, East Germany in 1958. He studied Church Music in Dresden, and received a Doctorate in Philosophy. From 1982 onwards he worked as a composer and writer in Berlin, and since 2008 has been part of the music staff at the Academy in Basel. "Ullmann creates quiet music to give himself and his listeners the opportunity to hear more, and better" - Bernd Leukert, from Fremde Zeit - Addendum.
PRAHA: Celetná - Karlova - Maiselov is themed around the Jorge Luis Borges story The Secret Miracle. The protagonist of the story is to be shot to death by a Gestapo firing squad and he asks God for a one year postponement, which is granted as the bullets are in flight. Time stands still. The piece is based almost entirely around numbers: Pythagorean fractions, subtotals, synopses and intersection points.
Voice, Books And FIRE 3 combines different texts in different languages to form a 'living polyphony'. "All [performers] are free to decide how and to what degree they want to establish or maintain a gap between their person and the piece."
Solo I+II+III. "The [instruments] perform at some distance from the audience, opening up an enormous soundspace"
A Catalogue Of Sounds: "Ullmann's music realises an infinite variety of gradations in all areas of musical formation" - Albert Breier
Composition For String Quartet 2: "On the one hand, there are events in the piece independent of him... on the other, he aimed to thematicise the connection between noise and sound. With an intimate knowledge of string instruments, aware of this history and at the same time ignoring it, he has made the production of sound into a texturing parameter of his compositions. It is probably the quietest quartet in history."

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