The Wire

In Writing

Showing posts from 2008|06

Far East sound

Derek Walmsley

Nice article on China's reggae heritage by Dave Katz, author of Solid Foundation. Not only did I not realise that Leslie Kong was of Chinese origin (and he's the guy who recorded arguably the best sides ever by The Wailers, some of the formative documents of roots reggae), but the scale of Vincent and Patricia Chin's VP label was brought home this week, when I realised they're now the people who own Greensleeves. Thanks for Steve Barker for pointing the article our way.

Tags:

LFO Peel Session

Derek Walmsley

If you download only one thing today, I'd heartily recommend the LFO Peel Session from all the way back in 1990 that you can find at robotsound. Spine-tingling stuff. Like Peel Sessions from many other electronic types, it ends up somewhere between a studio track and live one – electronic sketches rather than fully fledged dancefloor wreckers. But that's the beauty of it – spare architectural lines, immeasurably expressive. It seems to drip with adolescent yearning – not surprisingly, as LFO were still barely out of their teens. Yet, it seems incredible to recall, they were in the studio with Kraftwerk around this very time (you can find their handwritten account of it in Rob Young's Black Dog Publishing book on Warp Records).

Tags:

Derek Walmsley



With a certain synchronicity, just as Blissblog reminisces about old tapes (with the help of FACT magazine's Woebot), this item emerged from the postbag at The Wire – a promo release for the forthcoming Russell Haswell Editions Mego double LP Second Live Salvage (fearsome, thrilling noise architecture). The Wire office has been without a tape deck for a short while, so I had to do my own salvaging, retrieving mine from the loft to play it on.

I've no idea as to the sonic merits of tape versus CD or MP3. But in terms of how they are used, and how they embed themselves in you habits of music appreciation, there's lots to be said for tapes, specifically self-recorded ones which allow you to write many times/read many times. Many tapes of mine have changed like a patchwork quilt as I've dubbed new things next to old, over and over again. Strange juxtapositions emerge and persist (Black Dog Peel Sessions next to Will Oldham, Wu-Tang albums from mates bookended by Seefeel), and they become a living chronicle of obsessions and listening habits. Compared to the wealth of once-used CD-Rs which litter my desk, all of which carry a psychological traces of me wearily inscribing the album name on them, knowing soon they'll probably be lost among many other once listened to CD-Rs, tapes are like long lost friends. Of course, with iTunes, everything is at your fingertips anyway. But frequently one doesn't want them to be at fingertips. That conscious decision to access something feels too much like work, like acting as your own private librarian. Not only that, but you're at the mercy of the speed of the computer – so it's like being a librarian but needing someone else to clamber at that ladder for you.

Tags: