The Wire

Audio

Adventures In Sound And Music: Far Out Recordings

January 2019

Wire editor Derek Walmsley presents another show looking back on the best record labels out there right now with 90 minutes on Brazilian specialist Far Out

Ivan 'Mamão' Conti
“Aroeira”
From Poison Fruit
(Far Out)

Amaro Freitas
“Dona Eni”
From Rasif
(Far Out)

Hugo Fattoruso
“Candombe Beat Funk”
From Hugo Fattoruso Y Barrio Opa
(Far Out)

Amaro Freitas
“Mantra”
From Rasif
(Far Out)

Marcos Valle
“Nova Bossa Nova”
From Nova Bossa Nova
(Far Out)

Edu Passeto & Gui Tavares
“Vento Me Traz”
From Noite Que Brincou De Lua
(Far Out)

Edu Passeto & Gui Tavares
"Seguir"
From Noite Que Brincou De Lua
(Far Out)

Victor Assis Brasil
“Ao Amigo Quartin”
From Esperanto/Toca Antonio Carlos Jobim
(Far Out)

Victor Assis Brasil
“Dindi”
From Esperanto/Toca Antonio Carlos Jobim
(Far Out)

José Mauro
“Tarde De Nupcias”
From Obnoxius
(Far Out)

José Mauro
“Ponto De Chamada”
From Obnoxius
(Far Out)

José Mauro
"Arraial Da Lua Cheia"
From Obnoxius
(Far Out)

Piri
“Cupido Esculpido”
From Voces Querem Mate?
(Far Out)

Piri
“Reza Brava”
From Voces Querem Mate?
(Far Out)

Itiberê Orquestra Familia
“Bot Para Quebrar”
From Pedra Do Espia
(Far Out)

Sean Khan featuring Hermeto Pascoal
“Palmares Fantasy”
From Palmares Fantasy
(Far Out)

Ivan 'Mamão' Conti
“Bacurau”
From Poison Fruit
(Far Out)

Comments

It would have been nice if some research had been done into English translations of the titles (google translate does this pretty well), as they give a greater sense of the negative forces at work in Brasil when the albums were recorded, especially the Quartin re-releases. The titles often form a stark contrast to the sounds being heard. 'Voces Querem Mate?', for example, translates as 'You Want to Kill?' Nonetheless, the point was to get people interested in the music and the label and I reckon that worked, and I engaged in the whole process more actively by seeking out that sense of time and place. In which case, it's hard to know what strategy is most effective and I defeat my own argument. Music and its dissemination can be that subjective

"Vocês querem mate?"

'Mate' is an herb, traditionally consumed as an infusion (tea) by the Guaraní and other indigenous groups across an area that today corresponds to parts of Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina, and south/southwestern Brasil. Today it is a very popular drink throughout the region. It is usually consumed hot, though it can be served cold and sweetened (like Paraguayan 'tereré'), and is often shared from the same vessel with friends and family. Google translate gave you the translation "kill" because of the verb 'matar'. But if it were that verb in the song title, it would have to be in infinitive (unconjugated) form since it follows the auxiliary verb 'querer', as in 'vocês querem matar?'

Leave a comment

Pseudonyms welcome.

Used to link to you.