The Wire

Audio

Stream new album from Rome's paranoid quartet Metro Crowd

March 2019

Planning: is released by Maple Death on 22 March

Have you ever felt paranoid, alone and possessed on your morning commute to work?, asks the Rome based four piece, who are inspired by metropolitan psychosis.

Named after the subway C line that runs through Roma Est and the Pigneto neighbourhood, Metro Crowd are cartoonist Vic Sinex, Holiday Inn's Gabor, Sect Mark's Ludovico T and Toni Cutrone from Mai Mai Mai.

Singer Vic Sinex replied to a few questions over email.

What inspired the record?

Probably the terrifying idea of eye contact with someone, when you feel trapped in a silo, canned with other people, sharing with them the precious conditioned air. It could be easy to create panic with two words or a gesture, but when you are not so brave this idea remains in your mind only as a perversion. We had a few concrete ideas and abstract ways to play it.

Our first album was a kind of greatest hits from our bunker, not very harmonious but it worked in a place where many music fans still have to classify stuff as though they were in a supermarket. It’s a product: someone ate it, someone hate it. Planning: sounds a bit different. I think we evolved our sound quite spontaneously.

How did the band form?

I think someone plotted behind us. We met in East Rome, an area in constant evolution over the last ten years. There were many bands playing in the same clubs (Fanfulla, Dal Verme, 30 Formiche) and the endless building site of the third futurist subway line of Rome: the C line. Four years ago this metal swindle started to move people from suburbs to the centre as we mixed our influences between post punk, no wave, industrial, hardcore punk and 90s stuff, we didn’t have a precise direction. It’s proven that the machine works only while we are playing, so nobody can stop the process to talk, for common good.

How have people in Rome reacted to the music?

Rome is a city with five million people. For most of them if you are not rich and famous you play in a cover band, and we could sound like the worst cover band ever to them, but they don’t know who we are. Luckily we live and work in the wrong part of the city, where people die for music every day and pretend to have stopped to follow their other interests: they are our fans. Our audience is varied. Sometimes during live shows I see their face like people who have nothing to share. They look like they are asking themselves whether we are a real good band or just a bunch of imposters, especially when they hear my irritating voice and the guitarist’s “Chernobyl” flanger. Or when they see the jumps of the bass player or the grimaces of the drummer when he plays his delay effect. We’ve never tried to clear up any doubts, I still have many.

Planning: is released on 22 March via Maple Death.

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