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Gallery: Anne Bean: Self Etc

April 2019

Anne Bean, Elementa series (1974). A series of images originally conceived to be projected onto smoke. Photo by Chris Bishop

Moodies aka Moody And The Menstruators, Berlin, 1974. Clockwise from left: Suzy Adderley, Rod Melvin, Annie Sloane, Mary Anne Holiday, Anne Bean, Polly Eltes. Photo by Hans Fleurer

Anne Bean and the Kipper Kids, Los Angeles, 1979. Photo by Elisa Leonelli

Bow Gamelan Ensemble, Southbank, London, 1988. Photo by Ed Sirrs

PULp MUSIC with Stephen Cripps, The Fall Of Babylon, London, 1978. Photo by Chris Bishop

Same River, a work in collaboration with artist Rachel Gomme. Photo by Sarah Faraday at CAMP in the Pyrenees

Anne Bean, Shouting ‘Mortality’ As I Drown (1973), performed for camera in 1977. Photo by Chris Bishop

Anne Bean, The Shivering, Finland, 2014. Still from video by Tsai Chih-Fen. Part of the video work Night Chant (2014)

Bernsteins, Taking Measurements Of Yourselves As Artists, Fairlight Glen, 1972. Photographer unknown

Cover: Self Etc

Check out a selection of images from a new monograph documenting the work of installation, sound and performance artist Anne Bean

Anne Bean: Self Etc details the work of performance artist Anne Bean. Active since the 1960s, Bean was a founding member of the cult pop band Moody And The Menstruators. A group of five students in the Fine Art department at Reading University, they set out to subvert tropes of gender and sexuality. They first performed on a bill alongside Roxy Music. Bean has also worked with The Kipper Kids, Paul McCarthy, Steven Berkoff, Evan Parker, Brian Catling, Carlyle Reedy, Rose English, David Toop, Lol Coxhill, Jacky Lansley and Maggie Nicols, among others.

Co-published by the Live Art Development Agency, Anne Bean: Self Etc features extensive visual documentation of Bean’s performances, critical essays on her work and a series of new visual essays by the artist herself.

It's available via The Wire's online shop.

Subscribers can read Michael Bracewell’s article on The Moodies in issue 313 March 2010.

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