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Solange launches a personal online companion to Soul Of A Nation

Solange Knowles Ferguson opens her interactive dossier Seventy States related to the London Tate exhibition Soul Of A Nation: Art In The Age Of Black Power

Solange has created a digital interactive dossier as an online companion to the Soul Of A Nation: Art In The Age Of Black Power at London’s Tate Modern.

Called Seventy States, her dossier explores the visual concept behind her recent album A Seat At The Table. It showcases previously unseen performances and concept sketches for her music videos to “Cranes In The Sky” and “Don't Touch My Hair”, plus We Sleep In Our Clothes, (Because We're Warriors Of The Night), an original performance and score created by Solange in collaboration with Carlota Guerra, and two untitled poems.

"I wanted to create a specific scenography through movement and landscape to communicate my states of process through this record, I decided to do this through a visual language," states Solange on the Tate website. “There would be no hesitation should I be asked to describe myself today. I am a Black woman. A woman yes, but a Black woman first and last. Black womanhood has been at the root of my entire existence since birth.

“During the creation of A Seat At The Table and my deeper exploration into my own identity, I experienced many different states of being, and mind throughout my journey,” she continues. “I mourned. I grieved. I raged. I felt fear and triumph while working through some of the trauma I set out to heal from. The state I so greatly wanted to experience, but that never arrived was optimism. I couldn't answer my own question, if I had a responsibility as an artist to also express optimism in the midst of working through so much of my own healing.”

Earlier this year, the Tate exhibition also twinned with Soul Jazz label's release of the compilation album Soul Of A Nation: Afro-Centric Visions In The Age Of Black Power.

Soul Of A Nation: Art In The Age Of Black Power runs until 22 October. You can check out Seventy States at the Tate's website.